Solutions to 1st Code Road – Part 1/3

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Puzzle 1: At Your Fingertips

The first puzzle was clearly a word search. There is no wordlist but there were pictures splashing around the grid. A quick scan should quickly allow you to infer that these form the wordlist. Going from left to right the words represented are CALCULATOR, MUSIC NOTE, SUNFLOWER, CALENDAR, MAILBOX, CLOCK, PHONE, CLOUD, CAMERA, COMPASS and GEAR.

Once you’ve crossed them all off the grid, the leftover letters spell out:

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“Our most advanced technology in a magical and revolutionary device”, which is a part of what Steve Jobs said at the launching of the IPAD in January 2010.

Hints: The title “At Your Fingertips” should indicate a touch-screen device. Not sure if many people realize this, but the pictures that form the word list are ones that are commonly found as icons in Apple’s menu:

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Puzzle 2: It All Weighs Out

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The two men are Blaise Pascal and Jonas Angstrom. Both men lend their names to metric units, namely; the Pascal (Pa) and the Angstrom (A.). Pascal is a unit of force and 1 pascal is equal to 1 newton over a metre-squared. Angstrom is a unit of length and 10 to the 10 angstroms equals one metre.

So the missing face is that of Isaac NEWTON and his 6 letter surname is our answer.

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Construction Notes:

The first puzzle plays many roles, most importantly: hooking attention. With so many puzzles out there, one is unlikely to continue if the first impression is bland. Originally the first puzzle was the Killer Sudoku (puzzle 3). On second thought, it might intimidate non-logic puzzle solvers and scare them away; whereas a simple word search is self-explanatory and something you can instantly sink your teeth in.

NEWTON was on my things-to-do-with-apple list and he has to be an answer to some sort of puzzle. I knew that Newton was a unit of force and so was Pascal. I was unsatisfied with the equation that hasn’t included Angstrom in and thought of a way to get rid of the ‘metre’ and find someone who is also a unit of length. My first thought was Angstrom and all I knew was an Angstrom is very tiny. What I learnt was that an Angstrom is conveniently 1 over 10^10 metres and Puzzle 2 was born.

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